Daysie Hall with Dick Wick Hall Jr. (Dickie) and Jane in Salome 1925.

Such Mad Fun Prologue — All the Things You Were

I picked up the book carefully, wary of the mold on its faded cover. Rodents had gnawed through the corners and the edges of its pages. On this oppressive June day when the humidity intensified all sweet and sour odors, the book smelled terrible. It was headed for the landfill, but the playful inscription to…

Chucken soup

Chicken Soup for the Stars

Well the good news is Such Mad Fun is almost ready to launch. Thanks in part to the stellar team freelancing for View Tree Press, we received a starred Kirkus review a few days ago.  And I’m so grateful for the encouragement of advance readers.  So far only one typo has turned up, but then…

In the summer of 1933 there was much to look forward to.

Debutante Distractions in 1933

In light of all the current crises affecting Americans, who would believe that during the fall and winter season the tradition of holding debutante balls still continues in major cities?  Yet look how many of us loved immersing in the pageantry of Downton Abbey. The practice of presenting marriageable daughters to eligible young men from…

Jane Hall !933 Art School Drawing from her Sketch Book

An Artist or Writer or Both?

For decades Cooper Union had been directed by a Ladies Advisory Council, “whose members drove to the monthly meetings in early American Pierce-Arrows.”* In 1931, these prominent matrons decided to modernize the school. They found a new director, Austin Purves, Jr., who convinced the ladies of the value of coeducation – eventually 40% of the…

Cooper Union Foundation Building

A New World at The Cooper Union

Whatever happened to the Nightingale-Bamford Class of 1932?  Jane and one of her classmates described what they’d been up to for the  school’s 1933 Year Book: Five of the sixteen girls entered women’s colleges: two were at Vassar, two at Sweet Briar and one at Sarah Lawrence. Two others were on a European trip with one of their…

The Nightingale-Bamford School Today

“In Righte Gude Fellowshipe . . .”

The Hickses were thrilled that Dick Wick Hall, Jr., would attend Randolph’s alma mater, The University of Virginia. Once he was settled in Charlottesville, Jane and her aunt and uncle returned to New York and moved to a new apartment at 1100 Park Avenue near Jane’s new school. At the beginning of October, Jane put on…

Daysie Hall circa 1927- How she loved hats!.

“With you, my heart and soul have flown . . .”

“An American Paper for the American People – The Great Newspaper of the Great Southwest—The Paper for People Who Think.” The Los Angeles Examiner was bold in its claims and, on February 18, 1930, for the Hall family, it was  also the paper to read. On the front page of Section Two a short article proclaimed:…

Image of a Studebaker like "Teresa"

“Take It on the Chin”

“Mother decided to drive it right home from the store,” Jane recalled in August 1928 when Daysie Hall bought the boxy Six -Cylinder Special. They named the Studebaker “Teresa,” but before Dickie had even seen it, they had an accident on the less-than-perfect roads. Autos still had no turn signals or rearview mirrors, driver’s licenses did not require a road test, and danger…

DICK WICK HALL ON A BENCH IN SALOME

Where Is Dick Wick Hall Now?

On October 4, once again, the town of Salome, Arizona, and the surrounding community will celebrate Dick Wick Hall Days. I’ve been fortunate to participate in these festivities with each of my daughters. My grandfather’s most visible legacy still lies in Salome (where he’s pictured here), and in the other towns of the McMullen Valley among…